Category Archives: Monuments

Still Confused About Confederate Monuments?

This weekend’s events in Charlottesville, Virginia should clear things up for you. Have a look at these Nazis and neo-Confederates  marching in opposition to the proposed removal of a Robert E. Lee statue…shouting racist and anti-Semitic epithets. Anybody with any sense at all should get over the old “heritage not hate” nonsense. Like, right now.

Let’s call this what it is: a bunch of domestic terrorists lamenting a challenge to their beloved white supremacy. Many who gathered to oppose home-grown Nazism and the  KKK  were badly hurt today, and at least one person was killed – all in the name of Robert E. Lee and white power.

I have always stated without equivocation that these statues were monuments to oppression. My mistake was to advocate for preservation with context, as a means to educate posterity on the legacy of racial slavery and a 400-year history of injustice. Yeah. I’m over it. We’re in no danger of losing any “history” by destroying these things…they’ve all been well documented.

The faces of white supremacy

Now – for all of you who think we need to “unify” and put the past in the past…no thanks. I have no desire to unify with any Nazi or neo-Confederate. They can take their marble men and shove them up their asses.

K

Flag THIS

Screen Shot 2014-10-02 at 8.54.36 AMWell, I learned from reading Kevin Levin’s blog this morning that the good people of South Carolina may no longer have the Rebel battle flag represented among the national and state colors flying over their statehouse. Now if you have been following the flagger/flaggie/flagist news you will most likely note that this will be quite the blow to the “heritage” crowd.

I for one am glad to see it go. If only because it offends a significant portion of the Palmetto State’s population and thus should not be included in a public setting. Your thoughts are welcome.

With compliments,

Keith

Bitter…Table for One?

Screen shot 2014-03-11 at 2.55.31 PMFrom time to time I run across these little gems that I feel I need to share with the world. Here’s one I found while perusing the archives at Washington and Lee University’s Special Collection Department. Back story:  in 1980 (ancient history…) the good people of Darlington County, South Carolina gathered together to rededicate their Confederate monument – on the centennial anniversary of Darlington’s Rebels’ original  tribute to their glorious cause.

The speaker for the day was one William Stanley Hoole – a descendant of Axalla John Hoole, a Confederate Colonel of the Darlington Riflemen who was killed at Chickamauga.  Now you might figure Hoole (the speaker…not the dead Rebel) to be one of those reconstructed types. Let’s see what he had to say…..

Those gallant men and women believed that it was their right to dispel from their lives the economic modernism of the neighbors to the North and thus preserve their own landed conservatism. They shuddered to think that they should ever be forced to shoulder the yoke of Yankee domination. They wanted nothing more than their own country, a country they could love and be proud of, a separate nation, a confederation, a confederacy embracing a cavalier way of life, unfettered by the austerity of Northern Puritanism.

John Brown’s attack on the United States Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry had convinced the most reluctant Rebel that there was no longer any camaraderie between himself and his Yankee counterpart. As one Southerner [E. Merton Coulter] put it, “Black Republicanism has buried brotherhood between North and South in the same grave with the Constitution.”

Our beloved South Carolina, surfeited to the point of nausea by Northern insults and maledictions, as we all know, made the first move toward secession. They simply wanted to be left alone in peace. But the Republican regime in Washington, infiltrated by indecision, deception, and unprecedented machiavelism saw differently. Instead of letting the “Wayward Sister,” as they called our state, go in peace, they seized Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, dispatched addition soldiers, and ignored all appeals for amicable negotiation. These warlike acts at once rendered Fort Sumter a symbol of Yankee domination, an out-right indignity, an international insult, is you please, which could not be overlooked, even by the most ardent seekers of peace.

Yep – he sounds pretty angry, right? But I wonder….is he really “unreconstructed” or just confused? I run across people all the time who claim loyalty to the Union (as did Hoole) – yet pile this sort of inflammatory language high. Many, I find, are very much like their Confederate ancestors. Perfectly willing to embrace the post-war Union, so long as they could commemorate their war on their terms. What do you think?

With compliments,

Keith