Tag Archives: scholarship

The Americanist Independent: Volume One in Review

President_George_WashingtonGreetings all!

Volume One of the open-access web journal, The Americanist Independent is officially in the books.

I am extraordinarily happy with how all eight issues turned out. What’s more, I am thrilled to have worked with a number of very talented teachers, students, and independent historians. We did a good thing, folks!

For those of you how have yet to subscribe (remember…it’s gratis) you can do so HERE and click on any of the tabs. I suggest you begin with Scholarship. Here’s what you’ll get:

 

Issue One:

Explorations in Visualizing the Irish of the American Civil War by Damian Shiels

The American Slave: A Database – An Examination of the Methodology and results of Digitizing the Slave Narrative Collection by Keith D. McCall

Those Gals Had it Easy: The Conspicuously Untroubled Lives of Boydton Virginia’s Reconstruction Belles by Samantha Upton

RockinThruHistory: Learning History One Song at a Time by Damien Drago

Issue Two:

Chasing After the Daughter of the Lost Cause by Heath Hardage Lee

The North Carolina Confederate Pensions, Past and Present by Aaron M. Cusick

The Civil War Institute Annual Conference at Gettysburg College: CWI2014 Reviewed.

Harristorian Archives: The Pennsylvania Report of the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg

Issue Three:

The Checkbook is an Autobiography: The Case of Henry Clay Folger (1857-1930) by Stephen H. Grant

The Letters and Writings of Bill Evans, World War II Aviator by Mike Rogers

Recreating the “Good War”: Pride and Pitfalls in WWII Reenacting by Jared Frederick

Controlling Atoms: Evaluating the AEC During the Eisenhower Years, 1952-1958 by Nick Lacasse

Issue Four:

Creating Veteran Identity for Women within the Veterans Administration by Amy Rebecca Jacobs

Selling Mr. Consumer: Forming Male Consumer Identity by Nick Lacasse

The Tide of Domesticity: A Study of Gender, Environment, and Florida’s  Indian River Culture –  1870 and 1890 by Dara R. Vance

Every Piece of This War is Man’s Bullshit: The Women of Cold Mountain, a Review Essay by M. Keith Harris

Issue Five:

California Gold, Privateering, and the Russian Navy: A Story of the American Civil War by Glenna Matthews

“When Cleverness and Knowledge Arise, Great Lies Will Flourish”: Civil War Soldiers and Calculated Manipulation on the Battlefield by Mary C. Roll

History in the Classroom and the Interactive Notebook: A Conversation with Luke Rosa by M. Keith Harris and Luke Rosa

“Not All They Resolved It To Be”: A Review of The Field of Lost Shoes by Robert Moore

Issue Six:

One Nation, One Flag, One Language: The Grand Army of the Republic and Patriotic Instruction in Indiana by Nicholas W. Sacco

The March of Freedom: African-Americans in the United States Military and their Affect on the Civil Rights Movement, 1880-1950 by Aaron Nathaniel Stockel

Military Race Riots During the Second World War by Elizabeth Lambert

Fury: A Historical Review by Micha Benjamin Flowers

Issue Seven:

Messengers of Uplift: Fisk University Student Resistance in 1925 by Dara R. Vance

Podcasts and History: Why More Historians and Public History Organizations Should Podcast by Elizabeth M. Covart

Civil War Military Historians are Freaking Out by Megan Kate Nelson

In Defense of Gallagher, Hess, and Meier by Kevin Levin

Issue Eight:

LBJ and the Electrification of the Texas Hill Country by Jena Fuller

Patriotic Profiteers: Lykens County Coal Company and the Civil War by Jake Wynn

The Siege of Milwaukee: The Cause and Effect of Anti-German Sentiment by Kevin Kolesari

And there you have it – if you are a new subscriber you clearly have a lot of reading to do! Volume Two, Issue One is in the works – and things are looking great…so stay tuned for summer!

With compliments,

Keith

The Americanist Independent

Traditional.

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 9.44.02 AMYesterday I came across this post on Kevin Levin’s blog and could not resist a little walk down the road to snarksville. Kevin had posted an excerpt by Civil War historian Earl J. Hess in a recent issue of Civil War History lamenting the dearth of knowledge concerning “traditional” military history when it comes to Civil War genre scholarship – in particular: memory studies. He is what Dr. Hess had to say:

In addition, despite the appearance of some top-quality memory studies by Carol Reardon, Brian Craig Miller, and Kevin Levin, a number of examples of this genre exhibit poor scholarship. Unfortunately, it is easy for a graduate student to research postwar newspapers and throw together a pale imitation of David Blight’s book. The most serious weakness is that the author, when writing the obligatory chapter or two about the war as background to their main effort, cannot get the larger story right. When encountering such manuscripts while reviewing them for university presses, I often compile a list of factual errors about the conflict, in addition to many conceptual errors about their subject. Ironically, many of these memory studies are focused on individuals whose sole claim to fame is that they commanded large armies in the field. Yet, the authors of these studies know next to nothing about what the general in question actually did during the war, and they know even less about how traditional military historians have interpreted his career. (pp. 391-92)

With my usual flair for biting one-liner commentary I noted that “graduate students throwing together a pale imitation of Blight’s book is so ten years ago.” But in all seriousness, considering the growing body of brilliant scholarship published over the last decade or so, I was disturbed by Hess’s dismissive comment. I also found the notion of the “traditional” troubling. Whenever I hear that word associated with scholarship, in the sense that one must adhere to something set and unchanging, I imagine a scholar mired hopelessly in analytical muck. Like many of my colleagues, some of whom study military history, I think this problematic “traditional” word should go away. if anything it suggests a lack of change. Let’s face it, abiding by the traditional in history scholarship is entirely ahistorical.

What do you think?

With compliments,

Keith

The Americanist Independent

What You’ve Been Missing…

Screen shot 2014-04-26 at 11.44.44 AM
Bonus points and a shout out if you can tell me about this image.

Greetings all!

I am currently putting the final touches on the October 2014 issue of The Americanist Independent. For those of you who have yet to subscribe, you have been missing quite a bit. My idea behind the journal and website is to join the very best aspects of historical publishing with the ease and connectivity of blogging and social media. So far the project has been a tremendous success – so why not be a part of it?

So in addition to the community forum, the video component, and the much celebrated Student Portal, here’s what you’ve been missing – below is a comprehensive table of contents for the first four issues. Looks pretty damn good, right? And all for $4.97 a month, which is less than a burger and fries (and way better for you).

And just to prove that I am a generous fellow, click HERE and you can have a week’s full access gratis! Enjoy with my compliments.

 

Volume One, Issue One

Explorations in Visualizing the Irish of the American Civil War
By
Damian Shiels

The American Slave: A Database
An Examination of the Methodology and Results of
Digitizing the Slave Narrative Collection
By
Keith D. McCall

Those Gals Had it Easy:
The Conspicuously Untroubled Lives of Boydton Virginia’s Reconstruction Belles
By
Samantha L. Upton

RockinThruHistory: Learning History One Song at a Time
By
Damien Drago

Volume One, Issue Two

Chasing after the Daughter of the Lost Cause
By
Heath Hardage Lee

The North Carolina Confederate Pensions, Past and Present
By
Aaron M. Cusick

The Civil War Institute Annual Conference at Gettysburg College: CWI2014 Reviewed
By
Evan Clapsaddle, Albert Mackey, Ray Ortensie, and Marilyn E. Jess

Harristorian Archives: The Pennsylvania Report on the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg

Volume One, Issue Three

A Checkbook is an Autobiography: the Case of Henry Clay Folger (1857–1930)
By
Stephen H. Grant

The Letters and Writings of Bill Evans, World War II Navy Aviator
By
Mike Rogers

Recreating the “Good War:” Pride and Pitfalls in WWII Reenacting
By
Jared Frederick

Controlling Atoms: Evaluating the AEC During the Eisenhower Years, 1952 – 1958
By
Nick Lacasse

Volume One, Issue Four

Creating Veteran Identity for Women within the Veterans Administration
By
Amy Rebecca Jacobs

Selling Mr. Consumer: Forming Male Consumer Identity
By
Nick Lacasse

The Tide of Domesticity: A Study of Gender, Environment, and Florida’s Indian River Culture -1870 and 1890
By
Dara R Vance

Every Piece of This War is Man’s Bullshit: The Women of Cold Mountain, a Film Review Essay by M. Keith Harris

 

Have a historical day, and by all means…please spread the word. I’ll be your best friend.

Keith