Tag Archives: web courses

American Civil War Web-Course

Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 8.04.38 PMGreetings all! I have been posting updates on Twitter of late chronicling the progress of my next web-course: The American Civil War. I am very pleased to announce that the launch date is May 14, 2016. The course includes nearly forty video lectures and other projects covering military, social, political, and economic aspects of the conflict.

I am most excited to offer this course to my founding web-students for a 50% discount off the already reasonable price. You won’t find this deal anywhere but through this site – and the offer goes away on launch day. So you had better get on the stick. Here’s what you need to do:

ONE – be a current student or enroll now in either my Gettysburg or Reconstruction Era web-course for the regular discounted price available only from Keith Harris History.

TWO – sign up to be part of the Keith Harris History CREW so I can be sure to get you the info you need.

Get that all squared away and on launch day you will receive your discount code via email. And that’s it. Easy right?

With compliments,

Keith

 

LA Story

Screen Shot 2016-02-27 at 3.30.38 PMGreetings all – today I have been doing a good deal of reading about my most favorite city and adopted hometown, Los Angeles. This  metropolis, the City of Angeles, emerged, grew, and prospered in the most unlikely of ways. As part of my web-course series, I am in the beginning stages of organizing themes and a narrative that will tackle the history of this great city for a world of viewers…and perhaps offer something instructive for the thousands who move here each month. These few words, penned by writer Morris Markey in 1932, struck me as good a starting place as any:

As I wandered about Los Angeles, looking for the basic meaning of the place, the fundamental source of its wealth and its economic identity, I found myself quite at sea. The Chamber of Commerce people told me about the concentration of fruit, the shipping, the Western branch factories put up by concerns in the East. But none of these things seemed the cause of a city. They seemed rather the effect, rising from an inexplicable accumulation of people – just as the immense dealings in second-hand automobiles and the great turnover of real estate were an effect. It struck me as an odd thing that here, alone of all the cities in America, there was no plausible answer to the question, “Why did a town spring up here and why has it grown so big?”

Big indeed…and incessantly, inexorably  growing. Traffic alone will attest to that. As it were, I have made a three-picture study of LA traffic on Instagram today…just for the visual recognition that the issue seems to have been with us for some time now. At any rate, I believe there is an answer to the riddle of Los Angeles, and I am thus putting together the skeletal framework for the web-course City of Angeles: A History of Los Angeles as I finish production of my American Civil War course. The flesh is on deck…and those of you who are part of the crew will get the first crack at it.

With compliments,

Keith

PS – if you want to get a head start, here are a couple of books worth reading.

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The Fragmented Metropolis: Los Angeles, 1850-1930 by Robert M. Fogelson

 

 

 

 

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Southern California: An Island on the Land by Carey McWilliams

Video Clips – Send ’em In!

Screen Shot 2016-02-19 at 6.58.10 PMHi all – as you most certainly know, I offer a number of web-courses on United States history – you can check them out HERE. So far, the reviews have been very good…whether you are a buff or a student of history, I am sure you will get a lot out of them. At any rate…I am currently putting together a comprehensive course on the American Civil War and I need your help. Along with historical images, I am including video footage – trees, rivers, landscape vistas, battlefields – to enhance the narrative and bring the history to life.

Here’s the trouble – I live in Hollywood and the scenery around here is not particularly evocative when it comes to visualizing Civil War history. So I ask that you send in a 10-15 second video clip(s) of scenery…whatever you think looks cool. I am especially interested in videos showing southern-esque landscapes (Pennsylvania and Kentucky would be great too), without anything modern in the frame.

For your efforts, I offer to give you the course at no charge when it launches in early May. All I ask is that the camera is held steady – either stationary or panning – and you can see some sort of movement…such as leaves blowing in the wind or flowing water. Don’t concern yourself with the sound – I am dropping that out to add my own effects. You can send your videos HERE in an attachment.

Now’s your chance to go full Spielberg…and I will be forever grateful. Here’s a couple of examples for inspiration:

Thanks again!

With compliments,

Keith

The Reconstruction Era from Keith Harris History

Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 6.07.08 AMAnd……we are good to go!

I am very pleased to announce the launch of the latest in the Keith Harris History web-course series: The Reconstruction Era, 1862-1877. This is a 17-lecture series that covers the political, social, and economic themes of the period. I have supplemented each lecture with a list of key terms and an assortment of downloadable primary sources…so you can read for yourself what the historical actors were saying as you follow along. I designed this course especially for history students (high school/AP and college undergrads) but anyone with an interest in this most contentious and complicated episode of US history will find the course useful and engaging.

I offer this to my on-line crew for a special price HERE.

 

And here’s the cool part: the course is social-friendly. Meaning: at various points I pose analytical questions or topics for discussion and invite students to post their responses to me on Twitter or any other social media platform using the hashtag #harristorian…and voilà – personal instruction from yours truly and discourse with the student community.

An overview…

The Reconstruction Era, 1862-1877

Lecture One – Wartime reconstruction (Part One)Screen Shot 2016-01-21 at 6.29.44 AM

Lecture Two – Wartime Reconstruction (Part Two) The Port Royal Experiment, Davis Bend Plantations, Southern Louisiana and the Mississippi Valley

Lecture Three – The Meaning of Freedom

Lecture Four – Presidential Reconstruction

Lecture Five – Congressional Reconstruction (Part One)

Lecture Six – Congressional Reconstruction (Part Two)

Lecture Seven – Impeaching the President

Lecture Eight – The Election of 1868 and the 15th amendment

Lecture Nine – A Republican South

Lecture Ten – The Political Economy of Reconstruction

Lecture Eleven – The Challenge of Enforcement

Lecture Twelve – Violence in the South

Lecture Thirteen – Reconstruction in the North

Lecture Fourteen – Depression and Politics

Lecture Fifteen – The Election of 1876 and the End of Reconstruction

Lecture Sixteen – Redemption

Lecture Seventeen – Popular Culture: Reconstruction and Hollywood – The Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind

Coda: Things to Consider

Take the course…each lecture is between 15 and 18 minutes long and jam-packed with all the goods to help you ace the test, write the paper, or have something interesting to talk about at parties – impress your friends!!

With compliments

Keith

Greetings from Gettysburg

Screen Shot 2016-01-02 at 8.40.38 PM Screen Shot 2016-01-02 at 8.40.52 PM Screen Shot 2016-01-02 at 8.42.39 PMToday I am featuring these cool vintage postcards depicting some Gettysburg battlefield tourist hot-spots. And…to let you know, if you do not already, that I have put together what I think is a pretty chill web-course on the battle. I designed it especially for high school APUSH and college students who want to know the battle and the historical context in which it unfolded. I also think it is great for anyone with an interest (buffs…I love buffs) in Civil War history or for those planning a trip to the national battlefield park. It will certainly get you in the Gettysburg mood. You can access the course HERE.

And this is what the reviewers think:

Succinct but detailed presentation by an instructor with an engaging style. Nice visuals. Very good production values.

And…

Super concise and thorough. Love how he makes learning history fun 🙂

And another…

Professor Harris delivered an engaging and interesting way of approaching history. Rather than lecture and expect his students to accept his words at face value, Professor Harris challenges the student to engage the material and question long standing beliefs held by many. His integration of social media as a way of communicating ideas and engaging the material is superb. As he lectured, Professor Harris would periodically pop up in a side window to ask thought provoking questions, or to emphasize a point he had just made. Suffice to say, Professor Harris had no trouble making history come alive.

And there are more courses in production right now. I am nearing completion of a comprehensive course on the Reconstruction Era, and naturally, there is a Civil War course under development too.

So enjoy and please let me know what you think!

With compliments,

Keith